Happy Birthday Alfred Hitchcock (library movie checkout time)!

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Today (August 13) in 1899, Alfred Hitchcock was born.

In honour of said event, I will spell “honour” the English way and check out movies from my local library.

Hmmm. I could check out ALFRED HITCHCOCK PRESENTS…but I must admit I’m not keen on involvement in television shows.

I could check out Vertigo (1958), a great film, one I’ve seen many times and should own. Or I could check out Sabotage (1936) or Jamaica Inn (1939)…
So many choices from the #library with which to celebrate this day.
Something from the 30s will suffice methinks. And of course the trip back home will be via bicycle.

Thank you for reading.
Jesse L.
Twitter: @jltaglich

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Upcoming Phantom Library (a taste)

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I have been reading this blog post by Alonzo McBride and rereading PHANTOMS ON THE BOOKSHELVES by Jacques Bonnet. Great book.
There are plenty of relevant points in the small text to library collections and knowledge/resource organization.

I do, however, want to highlight a few lines right now.

“…to return to the library. Once it has been established, it [the library] tends to become an unavoidable transit zone for reality, a sort of vortex that sucks in everything that happens to us” (100).

Ponder away…

Bonnet, Jacques. Phantoms on the Bookshelves. Trans. from the French by Siân Reynolds. NY, NY: The Overlook Press, 2010.

Thank you for reading.
Jesse L.
Twitter: @jltaglich

Library Journal Review of Moretti’s THE BOURGEOIS

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I admit I posted this update to my writing a bit late.
C’est la vie.

LIBRARY JOURNAL has published a starred review written by me of Franco Moretti’s THE BOURGEOIS: BETWEEN HISTORY AND LITERATURE in the 15 June 2013 issue.

Take a look here.
Thank you.
More coming…

#Cyclists around DC: Be Careful on Lee Highway

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This post has been moved to my bicycle centric blog here.

Thank you.

Freedom to Read to Freedom to Read at #ALA2013

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My experience at the 2013 American Library Association conference & exhibition began before the official beginning by joining a Freedom to Read Foundation committee meeting and concluded with a variation on the theme via a Q & A on an important piece of rebel “science-fiction” writing.

ALA_2013_Chicago_Logo_FINAL_CLR_0

In between, I headed into meetings considering the value of education (whether it accomplishes its goals and its ROI), how to work out licensing for research data between research university libraries; we pondered the notion of classroom education vs project-based learning; I learned about a fantastic nonprofit created to link arts conversations to library programing (playing around with the idea of programming as collection development); I learned of public libraries dropping Dewey in their nonfiction sections for eye-readable language-based subject headings favouring the casual browser (logical within the assumption of the browser but not helpful to research-minded library patrons); and enjoyed a lively Q & A on privacy, surveillance and the NSA.

There were plenty more sessions attended by yours truly. I could write an essay on my experience. But here I will restrict my word-count to a relatively blog friendly number.

I wrote in the first paragraph my #ALA2013 experience was sandwiched by intellectual freedom themes…Well, my concluding session was a fascinating learning experience tied to an examination and appreciation of Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451. In this discussion we talked about banned books, a recent motion in a small town in Texas to remove the book from school reading lists and I learned the FBI investigated Ray Bradbury for eight years and for another six years only an expurgated version of F. 451 was in print. It was a pleasurable and engaging discourse on intellectual freedom – an abstraction Ray Bradbury referred to as “creative freedom.” Certainly, a theme of creative freedom can be found in library/learning conversations as a whole.

Don’t be afraid to bring up your own #ala2013 experiences or unifying themes. The more themes the merrier. Bring your ideas into the conversation below in the reply box or @Twitter.

Thank you for reading.