Late info: Review of Intrapreneurship Handbook for Librarians (published in 2018)

Posted on

Jesse A. Lambertson, “Arne J. Almquist and Sharon G. Almquist, Intrapreneurship Handbook for Librarians: How to Be a Change Agent in Your Library,” The Library Quarterly 88, no. 3 (July 2018): 303-304.

This is a review of the book mentioned published at LQ in July 2018.

I just wanted to get this to the site for future use.

https://doi.org/10.1086/697708

Theology Library Grows a bit each month!

Posted on

Happy to say that my theology library is growing a bit each month.

A couple of recent acquisitions: Crossway’s Greek text New Testament and a classic of reference, Vine’s Complete Expository Dictionary of Old and New Testament Words.

Large Libraries Provide Reading Potential

Posted on

Just a quick note – now that I have changed cities and jobs…

The Chicago Maroon (image from University Archives) (accessed 12 November 2019)

‘Tis so good to have access to such a large academic library collection – my reading is not met with any significant limits. Yes, I know, not every library has every book by every author. Not even Library of Congress has EVERY book (and they have the largest collection in the world).

I have found some obscure theological works, books on physics and time, international literature, as well as some of the best apologetic books in history. If by chance, something is not available in the collection, I make use of the fabulous ILL department (which, by the way, is one of the busiest in the United States).

I guess then I will keep reading.

Library Carpentry Lessons / Trainer in-Training…

Posted on

‘Tis not my first mention of The Carpentries on this site.

Specifically, I am now involved in Library Carpentry – currently going through certified instructor training and assisting in cleaning up lessons and documentation.

screenshot from Library Carpentry website, 13 May 2019

Coming up on May 30-31, 2019 is a Mozilla Sponsored ‘Sprint’ to edit Lessons, make changes to the website, and review the documentation against the newly created style guide.

So far, I have made some pull requests via Github and done some reviewing of documentation to see how it conforms to the style guide. The Carpentries community is a good group of teacher/trainers who want to assist each other by spreading some basic knowledge of relevant and potential technologies to the library community. I will be scheduling a teacher demo soon in order to become a certified instructor. So, I hope to continue my efforts in this community for years.

Looking forward to it.

EFA’s Five Substantive Principles – Endorsement!

Posted on

As part of grassroots efforts to stand for digital rights and related intellectual freedoms, I want to promote EFA’s five substantive principles:

  1. free expression: people should be able to speak their minds to whomever will listen.
  2. security: technology should be trustworthy and answer to its users.
  3. privacy: technology should allow private and anonymous speech, and allow users to set their own parameters about what to share with whom.
  4. creativity: technology should promote progress by allowing people to build on the ideas, creations, and inventions of others.
  5. access to knowledge: curiosity should be rewarded, not stifled

I endorse these principles with the support of a few of my collaborators. In particular, Brandon Smith, independent journalist, and George Walker, technologist and consultant.

#Privacy Chat, May 2019

Posted on Updated on

Privacy Week 2019

Jesse Lambertson … will discuss his top five recommendations for digital freedom!

6 May 2019 / 7-8:30 PM

Kate Waller Branch of Alexandria Public Library / 717 Queen St. Alexandria, VA 22314

Information here.

Privacy Workshop (27 April 2019)

Posted on Updated on

RE: my upcoming #privacy workshop : April 2711:30-13:00.

Location: Mt. Pleasant Public Library

3160 16th St. NW. ; Washington,  D.C.  20010

Found on the interwebs somplace…

Description:
Tis one thing to talk about privacy and intellectual freedom in the abstract, but do we connect these notions explicitly to concrete digital literacy? The aim of this workshop is to reveal, frankly, how some information is “read” in computers, how persons can better educate themselves and their friends & family in the area of digital privacy so each person can take his or her knowledge beyond simply content into the realm of digital context. This aim brings together the direct-action option of making a few adjustments to a user’s app settings by embracing a revised model of lifelong learning. The result more fully integrates the user’s own use of digital tools and their training of others to simultaneously provide better privacy and to educate each person about using digital tools more intentionally – even mindfully

Register for free here.